If you wish to contact me for any particular reason, please click here.

100 Araw ng Komiks (100 Days of Comics) is an online event organized for the purpose of spreading awareness of Philippine Komiks through Twitter, Facebook, DeviantArt, blogs and other online venues. Click here for the event page on Facebook. The Komikero Comics Journal will be posting everyday for the month of July news, opinions and commentary on aspects of the Philippine comics industry. Today, I will talk about Siglo: Freedom.

Siglo: Freedom is an anthology of comic book stories centered around the theme of “Freedom”, edited by Dean Francis Alfar and Vin Simbulan, published by Mango Books, Inc., in cooperation with Quest Ventures and Kestrel IMC, Inc, in 2003. Contributors include Carlo Vergara, Dean and Nikki Alfar, Anrold Arre, Jason Banico, Marco Dimaano, Andrew Drilon, Honoel Ibardolaza, Lan Medina, Elbert Or, Vin Simbulan, and Reia Vergara-Simbulan.

The book was launched on December 20, 2003 at Greenbelt in Makati. Watch the launching of the event in a video below, taken by Fil-am cartoonist Jeremy Arambulo.

My contribution to Siglo was a short story called “San Dig 1944″. “San Dig” is the pre-hispanic name of Brgy. Sta Catalina, a barangay at the northernmost point of San Pablo City where I think the Alanguilan family originated. My family has lived in San Dig for many generations and in fact, there are family legends that surround our name. There are stories that we were formerly the clan “San Gabriel” but our name was changed when a curse was placed upon the San Gabriel family by a witch, a curse that would keep our family destitute for seven generations. Some of the legend seems to bear out because my father is of the 8th generation, the first Alanguilan of our family to actually get a good education and a good job and our escape from destitution has continued with me (well, at least barely).

I decided to write about the family legend in “San Dig 1944″, and at the same time address one of the rumors that one in our family was once a Makapili. It’s something to be ashamed of, but it’s something I don’t really try to hide. That kind of thing is part of our family history, for better or for worse.

In 2006, “San Dig 1944″ was translated into Croatian in the Magazine “Q Strip”, a magazine edited by noted Croation comics writer Darko Macan. Click here to see a previous blog entry about it.

“Siglo: Freedom” came in both hardcover and softcover editions, and copies of this may still be available at selected branches of National Book Store, Powerbooks and Fully Booked.

Comments

Comments are closed.